Bird House

I saw some quick and easy bird cages being built by novice and experienced wood workers.  They were using 6-8 foot cedar planks and I thought I since I had some 6 foot planks left over from the planter that I’d just built for the backyard I would give it a shot making one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kitchen Utensil Holders

I found some extension table leaves of a table that had been long ago given away to a family member or to charity.  The leaves were in the back of a seldom used closet and had been forgotten about.

One side of the wood was already finished in a glossy urethane type substance and I thought this would be an easy and quick opportunity to make some utensil holders for the kitchen.  That was a false assumption to say the least.  Trying to preserve that finish was way more work than it would have been if I had just sanded, planed, re-sawn or used some other method to get the wood ready for glue-up.

The containers ae 10 sided and about 5 inches tall.  The wood appears to be maple with a OSB (oriented strand board) backing.  I added a small layer of sapele on top with a 45 degree chamfer then a trim of white oak separating the two woods.

 

 

Teak Bench Restoration

My son-in-law retrieved an old broken down teak bench that was being discarded due to some broken parts and just being in general disrepair. He asked if I wanted it for the teak wood that was still in good shape except for years of weathering, split wood. Some missing parts, and broken bolts, braces, and screws.

It sat in my side yard for a few weeks as I finished up a couple other projects and pending the purchase of a block of wood to replace some pieces that worn, broken or missing. The local hardwood stores didn’t have teak wood so I opted for a piece of eight-four Sapele as a substitute. As it turned out it wasn’t too bad of a match and after a teakwood oil it blended in OK.

I decided to try and restore the piece to its original shape and design as much as possible rather than re-purpose the wood for something else. I think either way would have been OK for such a nice selection of hardwood.

The underside of the bench. Some of the support blocks were broken and pieces of the slats were broken off.

Using clamps to hold things together to see what its going to take to put things back together.

Broken wood pieces replaced. Old weathered finish stripped, sanded and new coat of Teak Oil applied.

Finished bench in portrait view. Length is 5 feet, width is 15 inches and the height is 16 inches.

Salad Servers

The salad servers were made as a Christmas gift to my two daughters. They are a copy, structurally speaking, of the ones I my for my wife Janet about a year ago. That set was made from contrasting wood of soft maple and walnut. The set pictured below are made entirely of white oak. The “bread butter” t protect the wood from continued exposure to water is a combination of mineral oil and beeswax.

The original design was taken from a post by the YouTube maker Steve Ramsey. I modified his design and made these a little slimmer for looks and functionality purposes.

 

These four were made for my daughters as a gift for Christmas 2021.

 

This pair is the original ones I made for my wife for Christmas 2020.

Christmas Keepsake Box For The Wife

I made this keepsake box for my wife for Christmas. I got the inspiration from a YouTube maker channel called Newton Makes. It’s made from wenge and curly maple. I planed the wood thickness down to about 7/16 inch and the shelves to about 1/4 inch.

This is the first time I’ve used wenge and it is the most splintery wood I have ever worked with.  Three times I left the shop with splinters in my bleeding hand, especially under the fingernails.  

Newton’s box didn’t have the shelves but I added those after the wife wanted a little more versatility to store various sizes of jewelry and what not. At some point I will be adding red felt to the shelves and to the very inside bottom of the box.  I tried adding the fancy shaped legs that Newton made but I couldn’t get the twice sawn bandsaw shape to come out as intended.  Wound up just cutting an “L” shape bracket leg and adding a small taper towards the bottom.

I used Minwax Clear Semi-Gloss as a finish and applied about 4 coats in total. Fun project!

Small Box For Vanity

The box was made of 1/2 inch walnut plywood and purple heart scraps left over from a cutting board I made last year. The dimensions are 8″ wide, 6 1/2″ front to back, and 7″ deep.  

The top handle is made from solid walnut and its is finished with clear satin  wipe-on poly.

 

Refurbished Face Grain Cutting Board

This board was warped and I trimmed it up and put the walnut border around the original pine. I ran it through the thickness planer to make it flat and smooth. After it was all glued together I sanded it thoroughly and added several coats of a combination of beeswax and mineral oil. I realize the grains are opposing each other on the ends but I ‘m hoping the expansion won’t be too much to break the board apart.

This is a redo of the original board because it was run through the dishwasher too many times by one of my family members. I hope it won’t get that treatment this time around.

 

Pine Cutting Board

Woodworking Efforts Put to Good Use



The folding chairs that I made from a template bought from Jay Bates was joined by the small table made from recycled wood retrieved from a TV cabinet that was replaced by a newer model.  The chairs, a Christmas gift, are made from red oak and actually come completely apart for transportation or storage.

It’s nice seeing things that you make being put to good use, such as these. The photo was taken by my youngest daughter in her backyard.

 

 

Bookcase Built Using What I Learned In Online Class

The bookcase is one of the projects I built from plans and a video created by Steve Ramsey. A shout out to Steve. He got me started in woodworking about 5 years ago. He thoroughly explains procedures in his course offerings and videos. He uses tools that are affordable and doesn’t over think his projects. Sometimes I think he goes a little bit too much on the cheap, but overall I really like his work.

Repurposing Old TV Cabinet

My youngest daughter had an old TV cabinet that she recently replaced with a new, more open, sleeker model and gave me the old one to repurpose the wood as I saw fit. The old cabinet had a lot of wood to it, some was solid wood, some was MDF, and some was OSB.

I knew she needed a small end table for her living room so I selected various parts from the old cabinet and built the table pictured below. It was to replace an existing older table and the dimensions were fairly specific. No more than 16 inches tall and about 15 inches square.

All the wood but the banding around the two shelves came from the original cabinet. The banding was from scrap red oak that I trimmed to 1/4 inch and used a multi-beading bit in my router table to give the profile to the top edge.

The legs were a couple of pieces glued together and then tapered on a quickly put together tapering jig for the table saw. A first time for me using a tapering jig or the multi-beading bit profile.